What would you do if you weren't afraid?

WHO MOVED MY CHEESE, A FABLE ABOUT CHANGE

Wendy Lalli Water Cooler 0 Comments

Who Moved My Cheese? An Amazing Way to Deal with Change in Your Work and in Your Life,  by Spencer Johnson, was first published in 1998. It addressed the universal challenge of coping with change and the sense of insecurity that this creates. Of course, fear of the unknown has been felt by every generation and probably every species since the beginning of time. Yet, since you can’t grow without becoming different than you were before, the very definition of “progress” is “change.”

Johnson’s little book quickly made the New York Times bestseller list and remained there for almost five years, selling over 26 million copies worldwide. Now, almost 20 years later, it is still highly regarded by business managers and entrepreneurs of all ages and in all industries.

At Crux, we feel the tale of Sniff, Scurry, Hem and Haw is especially relevant today when change is not only constant, but also extremely fast and all encompassing. For example, the evolution from print to digital marketing in less than a decade has resulted in huge differences in the way product information is presented in every industry. Here are just four aspects of this change:

  • Every company that has a website has a global reach.

Just consider – products marketed on the web can be purchased by consumers around the world almost instantaneously – through virtual stores! So a mom and pop used book seller in California can serve customers in every state of the union. Moreover, a wholesale warehouse like Amazon has begun to replace major retail outlets in the course of a few years.

  • Social media amplifies customer word of mouth – and POWER – around the globe.

Word of mouth has always been the strongest form of advertising. However, today, one customer tweeting or writing a comment on your Facebook page – or their own – can influence would-be consumers worldwide! This makes pleasing the customer and addressing their concerns more imperative than ever before.

  • Brand advocates can make a product or brand a household word overnight.

Products such as cameras, cookware, running shoes, baby products, cosmetics and more mentioned by well-known bloggers can become preferred products as soon as they’re introduced. Because the bloggers are not industry professionals or celebrities, but actual product “users,” their credibility with consumers is unparalleled and their opinion about a product can determine a company’s success for years to come.

  • YouTube presentations allow marketers to run sales videos for FREE – 24/7.

Now even small companies can reach mass audiences by running videos on YouTube for nothing other than the cost of production. These pieces often reach far larger audiences than TV spots produced by large corporations and costing thousands, even millions, of dollars.

But please remember, all of these digital avenues for wide-ranging, cost-effective marketing need to be used well and exploited with a high level of expertise. Copy content, Facebook postings, YouTube videos, and blogs are out of your control once they go online. Any typos, misspellings, badly worded copy or unattractive visuals can undermine the reputation of your brand for years to come.

Crux Creative knows about change. We reinvent ourselves every day to make our services more relevant and valuable to our clients. For example, we provide strategy sessions to new prospects as well as current customers on the best way to incorporate the cost-effective aspects of digital communications within an overall marketing plan. We also provide guidance on how to build your plan so it enhances your customers’ entire experience with your brand. If this would be of interest to you, please call us at

(262) 298-5362 or email us at mallen@cruxcreative.com. We’d be happy to help you through the maze to find your new cheese as soon as possible.

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